Larrakitj

A larrakitj is traditionally used as a coffin for the bones of a deceased. The hollow log then rots back into the earth and the bones return to rock. Although still a very significant ceremonial symbol for the Yolngu, the Larrakitj is now reffered to as a memorial pole.

The artsts still paints their clan design and remains true to Yolngu law.

The Larrakitj is seen to be a remarkable sculptural piece of art and is collected by both institutions and private collectors worldwide.

Lulumu

Artwork


Artwork Lulumu
larrakitj

H: 253cm W: 0cm

The Madarrpa travelled to live permanently at Båniyala, clan land north on Blue Mud Bay under the direction of clan leader and father to the artist, Wakuthi. read more

Lulumu

Artwork


Artwork Lulumu
larrakitj

H: 234cm W: 0cm

The Madarrpa travelled to live permanently at Båniyala, clan land north on Blue Mud Bay under the direction of clan leader and father to the artist, Wakuthi. read more

Burru=tji

Artwork


Artwork Burru=tji
larrakitj

H: 160cm W: 0cm

This painting is by the daughter of high profile artist and ceremonial leader Djambawa Marawili and wife to another artist with profile and leader Wanyubi Marika. read more

Nhulunbuy

Artwork


Artwork Nhulunbuy
larrakitj

H: 193cm W: 0cm

Gurrundul is wife to senior Rirratjiu clansman and artist Wanyubi Marika. read more